♀ Feminism. Gender/ Social issues.

Ask   Submit   Trigger warning. Some people may find the content of this blog offensive.

washingtonpost:

“By a 6 to 2 vote, the divided court concluded that neither the Constitution nor Supreme Court precedents provide authority for the courts to overturn Michigan laws that allow the voters to determine whether racial preferences may be considered in decisions such as school admissions.”

Supreme Court reverses decision that tossed out Michigan’s ban on racial preferences.

— 1 day ago with 65 notes

stfuconservatives:

Race Didn’t Cost Abigail Fisher Her Spot at the University of Texas

Abigail Fisher is the charming young lady suing the University of Texas for not admitting her because she’s white. Ultimately, she’s challenging the legality of Affirmative Action. But as the Atlantic Wire points out, she had a lot of things working against her in her UT application - none of which were her skin color.

 In 2008, the year Fisher sent in her application, competition to get into the crown jewel of the Texas university system was stiff. Students entering through the university’s Top 10 program — a mechanism that granted automatic admission to any teen who graduated in the upper 10 percent of his or her high school class — claimed 92 percent of the in-state spots.

Fisher said in news reports that she hoped for the day universities selected students “solely based on their merit and if they work hard for it.” But Fisher failed to graduate in the top 10 percent of her class, meaning she had to compete for the limited number of spaces up for grabs.

She and other applicants who did not make the cut were evaluated based on two scores. One allotted points for grades and test scores. The other, called a personal achievement index, awarded points for two required essays, leadership, activities, service and “special circumstances.” Those included socioeconomic status of the student or the student’s school, coming from a home with a single parent or one where English wasn’t spoken. And race.

Those two scores, combined, determine admission.

Even among those students, Fisher did not particularly stand out. Court records show her grade point average (3.59) and SAT scores (1180 out of 1600) were good but not great for the highly selective flagship university. The school’s rejection rate that year for the remaining 841 openings was higher than the turn-down rate for students trying to get into Harvard.

As a result, university officials claim in court filings that even if Fisher received points for her race and every other personal achievement factor, the letter she received in the mail still would have said no.

It’s true that the university, for whatever reason, offered provisional admission to some students with lower test scores and grades than Fisher. Five of those students were black or Latino. Forty-two were white.

Neither Fisher nor Blum mentioned those 42 applicants in interviews. Nor did they acknowledge the 168 black and Latino students with grades as good as or better than Fisher’s who were also denied entry into the university that year. Also left unsaid is the fact that Fisher turned down a standard UT offer under which she could have gone to the university her sophomore year if she earned a 3.2 GPA at another Texas university school in her freshman year.

I highly recommend reading the article, because it starts with a stunningly similar historical case - the Brown v. Board of Education decision that ended Jim Crow laws. Abigail Fisher, like the plaintiff in favor of segregation laws, is a cute innocent-looking white girl who’s the perfect public victim for the evils of Affirmative Action. But as the Atlantic points out, she’s just another prop for racists trying to uphold white supremacy.

— 1 day ago with 838 notes
slantable:

Can You Take Race Out of Affirmative Action?

"Even if given a “level playing field”, we will never be able to correct for racial inequality while ignoring race. We can try, and in some cases we may superficially succeed – but to treat those as real solutions is wishful, counterproductive thinking."
- Hannah Clark on Fisher v. University of Texas

Read More

slantable:

Can You Take Race Out of Affirmative Action?

"Even if given a “level playing field”, we will never be able to correct for racial inequality while ignoring race. We can try, and in some cases we may superficially succeed – but to treat those as real solutions is wishful, counterproductive thinking."

Hannah Clark on Fisher v. University of Texas

Read More

— 1 day ago with 199 notes

reverseracism:

To every white person who blames ‘minorities’ and Affirmative Action for not getting into your top choice or that job position you thought you were entitled to because you thought being mediocre and meeting the basic requirements was enough.


You deserve every rejection letter/email you get.

— 1 day ago with 846 notes
"Grading college essays I can tell who’s not white–which is to say I know who got here based on merit and who got here via affirmative action."
Philosophy Graduate Student (via shitrichcollegekidssay)
— 1 day ago with 148 notes

owning-my-truth:

Source: Truths You Won’t Believe

Debunking more lies and racist misinformation about black men. Stop the ignorance and start to question why these myths exist in the first place, if not to demonize black men and promote the image of us as inherently criminal and violent and incapable of being educated. 

— 3 weeks ago with 62287 notes
nbcnews:

Teen gets into all 8 Ivy League schools
(Photo: William Floyd School District)
A Long Island high school senior who is the first-generation son of immigrants accomplished a feat few other students have even attempted — getting accepted to all eight Ivy League schools.
More from NBC New York

nbcnews:

Teen gets into all 8 Ivy League schools

(Photo: William Floyd School District)

A Long Island high school senior who is the first-generation son of immigrants accomplished a feat few other students have even attempted — getting accepted to all eight Ivy League schools.

More from NBC New York

(Source: NBCNews.com)

— 3 weeks ago with 613 notes
#education school college 
RIP Charlotte Dawson

abbeeblu:

After years of cyber bullying, ANTM judge, Charlotte Dawson committed suicide. She had been so open and upfront about her mental issues. She was a huge advocate for depression awareness and today she lost her battle.
I hope this loss will make society realise just how much bullying hurts and that depression isn’t an attention seeking behaviour.

— 1 month ago with 18 notes